Many Email Recipients Said to Have a Short Window for Clicking

SimpleRelevance-Email-Click-Frequency-by-Gender-Aug2013Consumers open emails throughout the day, but only click through those emails at specific preferred times, and those windows are often short, per results [download page] from a SimpleRelevance study. The study suggests that while email opens occur during as many as 23 hours of the day, 62% of consumers have only a single hour per day in which they prefer to click through an email message, a fairly surprising result. The researchers argue that because those single hours vary by customer, relying on only simple segmentation techniques, such as gender, misses opportunities for clicks.

It seems that women have a more limited window than men: 66% have only a single hour per day in which they prefer ┬áto click through an email to a marketer’s website, according to the researchers, compared to 57% of men.

While the study argues that emails received outside of a customer’s preferred time period will likely see a lower click-through potential, recent data from MailerMailer suggests that might not be the case. According to MailerMailer’s study, emails scheduled during the late night and overnight hours achieved the best click rates last year, at least within the US. The same pattern applied for email open rates by hour scheduled, despite the data suggesting that recipients were most likely to open emails at 10AM.

The SimpleRelevance research indicates that men and women are both most likely to click on an email at 9AM. For men, 6AM and 7AM are also strong hours, while for women, 10AM and 11AM are the next most likely hours for email clicks.

The researchers discovered some variances in email click behavior when sorting by income level. Consumers with annual income of at least $150,000 were more active in the early morning hours (5AM through 8AM), while those with incomes of less than $75,000 were more active from 9AM through midday. For the wealthier crowd, the peak hour for clicking was 7AM, while for the relatively less affluent, it was 9AM.