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Global Consumers Say TV More Indispensable Than SocNets

by MarketingCharts staff
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Strong Age Gap Found

There was a significant difference when breaking down the data by age groups, with preference for TV declining alongside age. In fact, while 68% of 50-64-year-olds said they would take TV over social networks, this dropped to 62% among 35-49-year-olds. And those under 35 were evenly split on the two, which Ipsos suggests is a harbinger of what’s to come.

In other analysis, those with lower household incomes are slightly more apt to give up TV than those with higher incomes (44% vs. 40%), while non-married individuals are more than 20% more likely to say they would give up TV than those who are married (45% vs. 37%). There is no consistent pattern along education levels, but those who are not employed are slightly more likely than those who are to say they would give up TV (44% vs. 41%).

Business Execs More Apt to Prefer SocNets

Although a majority of business owners and senior executives say they would forego social networks before TV, they are slightly more likely than others to show a preference for social networks. For example, while 59% of respondents who do not own a business said they prefer TV, this drops to 55% among business owners. Similarly, although 59% of respondents who are not senior executives, decision makers, or leaders said they would forego social networks over TV, the proportion dropped to 54% among individuals who identified as senior executives.

Slight Gender Gap Apparent

Data from the Ipsos study indicates that on a global basis, men are about 5% more likely than women to say they would give up social networking over TV (60% vs. 57%). Within the US, that gap is slightly more pronounced, with men 7% more likely than women to say they would give up social networking (77% vs. 72%).

This is most likely a reflection of increased adoption of social networks by women, with a September 2011 Nielsen report showing that females are the most active social networkers. The same report found 18-34-year-olds 8% more likely than the average to use social networks.

About the Data: The Ipsos data is based on a survey of 12,500 consumers in 24 countries conducted in January 2012.