In-Store Messaging Drives 2 in 3 Impulse Buys

integer-consumer-impulse-buys-april2012.jpgMost consumers just can’t help themselves when it comes to off-list shopping, and in-store messaging is the key influencer in their impulse purchases, finds The Integer Group and M/A/R/C Research in April 2012 survey results. In fact, 9 in 10 shoppers admit making off-list purchases, with roughly 3 in 5 of these shoppers buying an extra 1-3 items. Fueling this behavior is the presence of in-store messaging drawing attention to a sale or promotion, with 66% citing this as the reason for their off-list purchases. Integer insight suggests that this proves the power of reaching a particular shopper at the right time with the right message.

Coupons Also a Force

Data from “The Checkout” indicates that 30% of off-list shoppers cited finding a coupon as a reason for their impulse buy. This comes amid recent results from a MarketTools survey that suggest that 49% of grocery shoppers claim that a coupon would not influence them to buy an item they don’t typically buy. The flip side of that point being of course that presumably the other half of the respondents would be influenced by a coupon.

Meanwhile, slightly less than one-quarter of “The Checkout” survey respondents said the reason for their off-list shopping was because they just wanted to pamper themselves.

Brands Most Influential for List-Making

Among list-makers, coupons also have a role to play in the items they list for purchase, although a slightly smaller proportion of shoppers are influenced by them as are by the brand of product they currently use (57% vs. 61%). A similar percentage (56%) said that store ads or circulars influence their list.

This conflicts somewhat with survey results from SymphonyIRI released in January. According to SymphonyIRI’s survey of consumer behavior in Q4 2011, half of the shoppers reported using a store circular to make a list prior to going to the grocery store, while 42% used coupons to make a list. Listing specific brands to buy was much less popular (16%).