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Latinos Like to Set, Follow Shopping Trends

by MarketingCharts staff
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Past survey results have shown that Hispanics have adopted mobile banking and finance at a faster rate than the general population, and indeed, the survey results from Leo Burnett and Lapiz also show that Latinos are far more likely than non-Latinos to shop with a mobile phone (56% vs. 33%) or tablet (43% vs. 25%). This demonstrates that in general, Hispanics have an inclination to try new products and technologies, a tendency that translates to the shopping process.

Shopping is a Social Experience for Latinos

Further results from the “LatinoShop” study indicate that Latinos take more of a social approach to shopping than non-Latinos. That approach involves both online and offline behavior: 37% reach out to friends and family (compared to 17% for non-Latinos); 36% share opinions and write reviews (versus 18% of non-Latinos); and 48% use social networking sites (compared to 31% of non-Latinos).

One area in which the gap is even more significant: shopping with kids. 45% of Latinos surveyed enjoy doing so, more than triple the proportion of non-Latinos (13%). These findings affirm earlier survey results from Sensis and White Horse and Univision which demonstrate Hispanics’ propensity for social experiences in a range of areas, from shopping in-store to visiting quick-service restaurants.

Other Findings:

  • Certain identified traditional media prove more influential to Latinos than non-Latinos. That’s true for radio (72% vs. 46%), billboards (59% vs. 35%) and infomercials (52% vs. 23%).
  • When shopping, Latinos are motivated by their senses. 55% like to touch and feel a product before buying it (versus 38% of the non-Latino survey sample), while 49% judge product quality by its product packaging (versus 19% of non-Latinos) and 36% think it’s fun to immerse themselves in the store atmosphere (compared to 13% of the non-Latinos surveyed). That points to a favorable disposition to shopping in-store versus online, a preference shared by 6 in 10 Americans.