Social Networks Impact Music Downloads; Piracy Growing

August 2, 2007

This article is included in these additional categories:

Europe & Middle East | Media & Entertainment | Radio | Retail & E-Commerce

While music piracy is on the rise and legal downloads of music are slowing down, social networks are having a serious impact on the way users consume music, according to a survey by Entertainment Media Research (EMR) and law firm Olswang.

olswang-music-social-networking-site-importance.jpg

The survey interviewed 1,700 music consumers age 13-60 and found that music is important to social networkers: 39% have embedded music in their personal profiles.

70% said they embed music to show off their taste; half said music is a good way to reflect personality.

olswang-music-social-networking-site-impact.jpg

Some other survey findings:

  • Some 53% of people actively surf social networking sites to find music.
  • 30% said they went on to buy or download music that they had discovered on a social network site (for MySpace, the proportion is 36%).
  • On popular sites the numbers of people who use sites to find music increase – for MySpace and Bebo, 75% and 72%, respectively, and 66% for YouTube.
  • 46% say they wish it were easier to purchase music they had discovered on social networking sites – for example via a “buy now” button on the site.
  • The number of those saying they illegally download music tracks has increased, from 40% in 2005 and 36% in 2006 to 43% in 2007.

olswang-music-illegal-downloading-plans.jpg

  • Only 33% cited the risk of being prosecuted as a deterrent against illegal downloading, compared with 42% in 2006.
  • Nearly one in five respondents – 18% – claimed an intention to download more unauthorized tracks, up from 8% in 2006.
  • After a dramatic 40% increase in the number of legal downloaders between 2005 and 2006, only 16% growth occurred in the number of legal downloaders from 2006 to 2007.
  • 22% of legal downloaders admitted that they had not paid for a track in the last six months.
  • 84% agreed that digital downloads of older music should be cheaper; 48% said they would be prepared to pay more for newly released music.

olswang-music-downloading-frequency.jpg 

The survey report is available via the EMR site (pdf). 

Sources: BBC News and The Guardian

Explore More Articles.

Marketing Charts Logo

Stay on the cutting edge of marketing.

Sign up for our free newsletter.

You have Successfully Subscribed!

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This