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adobe-social-media-measurements-jul11.gifMore than half (54%) of North American marketers measure the traffic volume generated by social media, according to the Q2 2011 Quarterly Digital Intelligence Briefing from Adobe and Econsultancy. A similar 53% also measure engagement with their Facebook brand page and Twitter accounts.

9 in 10 Say Value of Traffic Volume Important

While a low 31% of marketers currently measure the value of social media traffic volume, a high 91% say this metric is important. Interestingly, while brand sentiment was ranked second in perceived importance (81%), it only tied for fourth in terms of current practice with frequency of social media brand mentions (49%). Slightly fewer marketers think social media traffic volume is important (53%) than currently measure it.

Marketers See SocNet Trends as Valuable in 2015

Large percentages of marketers think a number of social media trends and tactics will be important in terms of their organizational impact by 2015. For example, a combined 94% say social media marketing will be “highly” or “quite” significant. Other social media trends/tactics with a high percentage predicting near-term importance include social media for user-generated ideas/content (86%), social media for customer service (84%) and use of Facebook as a direct commerce channel (64%).

It is also worth noting that 94% said the proliferation of devices such as tablets and smartphones will be highly or quite significant by 2015.

6 in 10 Measure Mobile Traffic Volume

About six in 10 marketers (58%) currently measure the volume of mobile traffic, while 70% say this is important. About four in 10 (43%) measure the type of mobile platforms visitors use, with six in 10 (60%) saying this is important. Although only 28% currently measure the value of mobile traffic and 27% currently measure the differences in behavior between mobile and other visitors, much larger percentages (79% and 67%, respectively) say these are important metrics.

Only 1 in 4 Say TV Crucial Tool for Masses

Only one in four (25%) marketers agree that you still must use TV to reach the masses, while 53% disagree and 21% are neutral. Meanwhile, 93% of marketers agree brands must participate in an ongoing conversation with customers and 84% agree B2C brands should participate in social media. A somewhat lower percentage (74%) say B2B brands must participate in social media. About half (49%) agree brands are defined by customers conversing online, with a large 34% neutral response.

Other Findings

  • 55% of marketers agree measuring the impact of social media marketing is very difficult.
  • 64% of marketers agree content marketing is more important than advertising.
  • 62% of marketers agree customer service is a primary sales channel.
  • 17% of marketers say social media is currently highly significant to customer service in terms of impact on their organization, but 46% say it will be highly significant by 2015.
  • Only 1% of marketers rate their organization excellent for using social media to improve customer service, while 60% rate it weak.

Compete: 2 in 3 Users Say Twitter Influences Purchases

In one example of how social media can influence consumer behavior, a combined two in three (66.1%) Twitter users say retailer feeds on the social network have influenced their decision to purchase products or buy from certain retailers, according to data collected by Compete in April and May 2011. Data from the spring 2011 Online Shopper Intelligence study indicates 28.6% of Twitter users consider retailer feeds influential, 25% consider them very influential and 12.5% consider them extremely influential.

About the Data: This Quarterly Digital Intelligence Briefing is based on an online survey of more than 900 client-side and agency respondents. Adobe and Econsultancy promoted the survey to their respective user bases. The sample included 247 respondents based in North America, out of which 108 were client-side (in-company) and 139 were supply-side (mainly agencies).

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